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Newspaper Archive of
Bath County News - Outlook
Owingsville, Kentucky
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February 20, 2003     Bath County News - Outlook
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February 20, 2003
 

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Communikie00 THE BATH COUNTY NEWS-OUTLOOK Ow.ingsville, Ky.--Week of February 20- February 274 2003 Carol Stephens' dream was to become beautician [ --from front page ] In 1996 she went to school again to become an apprentice instructor. When she completed the required hours, in April 1997, she began work- ing part-time as an instructor. Being on her feet all day, and working with her hands, began to take its toll on Stephens physically. "I knew I wouldn't always be able to work 'behind the chair', as we say," she says. "But 1 wanted to at least remain in the field." The remaining time she had was spent at her shop, which she moved to Oberline Street in 1998. She had needed a bigger shop and more park- ing. She says there is an important bond between a hairdresser and their clients. Gaining their trust and mak- ing them comfortable is crucial. "Being a hairdresser is kind of like being a doctor," she begins. "You wouldn't trust your health with just any doctor; and you wouldn't trust your hair with just any hairdresser." "You have to make suggestions rather than telling them what they should do and you have to have the knowledge to know what will look good." Stephens says when someone would come in and tell her to "cut it all off," she always told them she'd do it, but before her scissors went to work, she offered specialized advice to some. "I'd say, now remember, the last time I did that you cried for six months until it grew out!" In 2000, the day after prom, Stephens developed a slipped disk in her neck. Her doctor told her i! was a result of her holding her arms up for so long, while working with hair. tter injury would take six weeks to heal. Stephens knew that it was a sign she wasn't as young in the pro- fession as she used to be. Realizing she needed to lessen her work load, she gradually trans- ferred more of her clients and work to her employee, Tammy Jo White. "It was hard for me to not work," says Stephens. "What carried me through was the teaching." With a chuckle she adds, "IfI had to give it all up, I'd have gone crazy." By January 2003, Stephens was only working at her shop one day a week. But before the month ended, Stephens made a big decision. With her husband's strong support, she decided tosell her shop. White would be the buyer. "I hated to give it up," she says, her voice trailing off. "I thought, in the back of my mind, that she would want to buy it--she was ready." Stephens says she had a great deal of faith in White, who was a former student of hers. White had a lot of experience under her belt in a num- ber of shops. "I told her, you need to take the ship and run it the way you want to." White, who had been at Corner Cuts two-and-a-half years, bought Stephens' business after Stephens' named the price. "I wouldn't have sold it to anyone but Tammy Jo. She has such ener- gy--I used to be like that." Olive Thompson, 93, was Stephens' oldest customer (She was also her elementary school teacher). Appropriately, she was Stephens'last customer before she officially hand- ed the reins to White. She has customers and people she'll miss, but she's content that they're in capable hands. (What she won't miss are sore arms, the threat of varicose veins and irregular hours.) Her Thursday regulars were wom- en she had known all her life. Stephens would pick some of them up for their appointments, then take them to run their errands in town before she delivered them back to their homes. She used to take one of her regular customers, the late Oakie Bailey, on a drive through the cem- etery each week. Scheduling the time for such per- serialized service was difficult at times and meant longer work hours, but Stephens did it anyway. And at no extra fee. "I just always thought to myself, 'someday rll be there'," she says. She also helped out behind the scenes with the May Day beauty pageant. She did hair, make-up and touch-ups throughout the day for the girls she worked with. From 1992 to 2002, Stephens missed only two pag- eants. Stephens has no regrets and is able to look back on her career with a smile. She says it has been "satisfy- ing." "It was everything I expected it to be," she says. "It was always a busy life-style, but I liked it when it was, she says. She's slowed the pace a bit nowa- days and is one of four who instruct at Nu-Tek Beauty Academy. Stephens works there four days a week, teaching what she calls the "basics" to the younger students. Those "basics" include manicures, pedicures, facials, make-up applica- tion, shampooing and more. In the afternoons she works the floor, over- seeing students' hands-on work. "I wanted to be an instructor be- cause I thought, if I can help one person that wanted to become a hair dresser as bad as I did, then I'd be pleased." She also has been enjoying regu- lar hours and weekends off. She says she hadn't had a Saturday off since 1990. She also wants to enjoy her son, daughter and three grandchildren more. Being a beautician was very ful- filling to Stephens and now, teach- irjg others with the same desire, has continued to make her life's work very rewarding. First night meeting of fiscal court draws good attendance I --from front page ] A grader would allow the county road crew to do a lot of work on their own, as opposed to contracting it out, said Shrout who recommended the purchase. Shortly after, a motion was made, and carried, to seek the lowest rate on a grader and make the purchase. Two members of the Sharpsburg Water Board were in the audience to voice their displeasure concerning the fact that members of the Salt Lick Water Board were getting paid $10 more than they were. The two asked for the court to give both boards the same consideration, because they , were doing the same job. A motion to give both boards the same pay was made by Martin and carried 4-0. The court appointed Willie Sta- ten to serve a four-year term as search and rescue coordinator. A second motion was made to re-appoint Ver- non Barber as DES director. Executive secretary Ann Lykes was re-appointed as FEMA appli- cant agent. At last month's meeting, the court voted to give Jailer Palmer Crouch an extra $1,000 for the purpose of paying a deputy. A motion was made to amend the previous motion, delet- ing the amount, because Crouch isn't going to hire the deputy. Many of the audience members were county employees who came making two requests; that their pay- checks to be issued weekly and that health insurance coverage for them- selves and their families be looked into. The discussion between the gov- ernment and the county employees was lengthy. One county employee suggested that the county and city team up to offer insurance coverage. Judge Shrout said he had no objections to the idea and it could be looked into. The motion, made by Martin, was to give hourly employees a weekly paycheck and to pay (in full) insur- ance coverage for the employee (not' their family members). The vote was 4-0. Members of the Bath County Res- cue Squad were present to make a request for greater financial support from the county. The count, gave the rescue squad $5,000 in December. The rescue squad operates on money from grants, fund-raisers and dona- tions. Judge Shrout requested the mat- ter be tabled so it can be looked into. A man in the audience asked the court to look into vacation and sick days forcounty employees. Current- ly, a 17-year employee gets the same amount as an employee who has worked for one year. The matter was discussed, and then tabled so it can be considered. Ccncern over funding for ' b ings eet ',atJ0n r t 00use to capital [ --from front page [ they will fight to make educatmn a priority and insure it receives ade- quate funding. "I appreciate the teachers coming to express their concerns. When you believe in something and strive in something enough, it is nice to see the teachers do just that," said Sen. Vernie McGaha, R-Russell Springs. "Being a former educator myself I understand the desire to have their voice heard. It is the primary goal of state government to provide educa- tion," added Sen. McGaha. You are reading l.istory being made in Bath County. Ice results in loss of power to city and parts of the county Sunny Kramer News-Outlook Staff Writer The aftermath of Kentucky's worst winter storm in years has been diffi- cult for the majority of county resi- dents. Power outages affected numer- ous city and county residents, in- cluding two nursing homes. Both Bethel and Sharpsburg were hit hard. Power and phone lines were down and poles holding those lines were broken. The community of Bethel was completely out of power and resi- dents were without phones since ear- ly Sunday morning. Three broken utility poles near Tabor's Comer were the root of the problem. As of Wednesday morning most Bethel residents were still without power. Some Fleming-Mason cus- tomers were back on, but KU cus- tomers were not. In Sharpsburg, some city residents and businesses had power but many didn't. Rural areas were mostly out. Route 11 and Hwy 36 was re-opened Tuesday afternoon after downed util- ity poles and tree limbs were cleared away. Owingsville now has power, The only exception is Bath County High School, where a downed utility pole cut off the power supply to the build- ing. The power, which had gone out early Sunday morning, affected the largest portion of the city and was back on by ! p.m. Monday. From the Bath County Courthouse, down Slate Avenue to the interstate and Kendall Springs Road never lost power. The Salt Lick area was fortunate and never lost power and only expe- rienced some precipitation. Still there are some parts of the county without power though no numbers were available as of press time. Bear pairlt/ng--This painting of at play is on display at Bath County Memorial proud to showcase the talent of Eddie Carter. (Photo Kincaid) Meed help wih your ndverising7 #,,all "i!i!!ii!iiiiiiiili ilf.r.,' !:= bi00thda, .9 would ,00.eee hie a,je ii i!I KENTUCKY 'i :Z..ii.i ._.i ................. i ............... 11 Su Tuesday, February 6:30,8 p.m. Pathways Building Mt. Sterling For info, ntact: Gloria Metz at OwingsviHe ODLAND 19 Water Street Owingsville (e06) 674-2211 Pork Shoulder Blade Cut Steak or Roast, Ib ............... 89 Fresh Chicken Leg Quarters, lb., (sold in 10 lb. bags) .... 29 lb. Boneless Beef Chuck Pot Roast, Ib ...... : .... : ........ $1.99 Westem Style Pork Ribs, Ib ....................... . .$1.19 93% Lean Fresh Ground Beef, Ib ..................... $2.29 Cumberland Gap Sliced Bacon, 16 oz ................ 2/$5.00 Cumberland Gap Semi-Boneless Half Ham, Ib ........... $1.69 Oscar Mayer Fun Pack Lunchables, 6-13.2 oz., sel. var...2/$4.00 Boneless Bottom Round Steak, Ib ..................... $2.99 ALWAYS THE LOWEST PRICE -- WE'LL MATCH ANY ADVERTISED PRICEII Camel (Excludes NonFilter) ............................. $21.99 Winston ............................................................ $21.99 Doral ........................................ , ....................... $18.99 Marlboro ........................................................... $20.99 Parliament ........................................................ $25.49 Virginia Slims ................................................... $25.40 Basic ................................................................ $18.99 Salem ............................................................... $24.49 Keel .................................................................. $19.49 Pepsi Cola & Pepsi Cola Products, 2 liter, with 2 filled cards .... 69 Foodland Milk, clallon, with 2 filled cards .................. $1.09 Crisp Head Lettuce, limit 2, with 2 filled cards, each .......... 29 Big Chief Granulated Sugar, 4 lb., with 2 filled cards .......... 89 SUNDAY ONLY!- Whole Roasted Chicken, w/2 filled cards, ca. $1.99