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Newspaper Archive of
Bath County News - Outlook
Owingsville, Kentucky
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February 28, 2002     Bath County News - Outlook
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February 28, 2002
 

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a il t,i CommuniLic00 I. THE BATH COUNTY NEWS-OUTLOOK II Owingsville, Ky.--Week of February 28 - March 7, 2002 I Add two---Sean Bailey, (12) and center for the Bath County High School Wildcats, went in for the lay-up during the Bath/Lewis County game. The game was on Friday, February 22 at home. Awaiting the outcome is Phillip Sorrell (2). (News- Outlook photo, Ken Metz) Memorial Library Genealogy Department is the place to begin journey into family history likes and things such as the way they laughed orthe way they dressed can better illustrate their personali- ty. "You put together a human be- ing," says Denton, Well said. In the book BlueGrass Confeder- tL, the diary of Edward Guerrant, he went so far as to describe--in detail--his lovers laugh. That detail of someone's person- ality, typically brushed aside, is probably "priceless to someone among her descendents. And may- be someone else can say to their daughter, 'you have your great-great- grandmother's laugh!' Some of those details can lead to broader conclusions on what type of person that individual may have been at one time. "It's amazing how quickly we're forgotten," says Denton. If you think abotit it, we have no real excuse not to document our present. With cameras, tape record- ers and video cameras at our dispos- al (not to mention an endless supply of pencils), we should all be docu- menting various things. Not necessarily everyday, but just from time to time. So we don't forget. And so future generations will one day be able to have a clearer picture of who we were and how we lived. Early Childhood Council gets a $10,000 grant I --from front page 1 at(606) 674-2352. Future trainings will also be scheduled. The Rise and Read program will be a Saturday morning program for parents and children 0- 5 years old to increase the importance of reading to small children. Three programs have been slated for March 23 at Owingsville Elementary School Caf- eteria, April 6 at Bethel Elementary School Cafeteria, and April 20 at Salt Lick Elementary School Cafe- teria. The program will begin with a breakfast donated by a local restau- rant and the Bath County Memorial Library children's librarian will have a program for parents and children to enjoy and learn from, then the book- mobile librarian will check out books to both the children and parents. Parents will also be able to meet with a representative from the Child Care Resource and Referral Agency to discuss any concerns about child- care and to complete an assessment of their childcare provider. All coun- ty licensed and certified childcare providers are also invited to attend. L --from front page I became Fincastle County, Virginia, before it was deemed Kentucky County, Virginia in 1776, with the seat of the county government at Harrodsburg. It was in 1780 that Kentucky County was divided into Lincoln, Fayette and Jefferson coun- ties in Virginia. Kentucky became a state in 1792. The library has seen people from all over (even Texas) come in to do research. "In winter it slows down, but when vacation time comes, it gets busy; you never know from day to day whether we'll use this room or not," says Crump. She says sometimes a person will need a quick, small detail--a piece to complete a puzzle. Others spend days digging. "If there is a Bath County con- nection, they'll be here," says Crump smiling. Dareen Cauclill, from Mt. Ster- ling, has been doing genealogy work now for 11 years. Curious about history since childhood, she began with her own family and then ex- tended into her husband's side. "It makes you curious, one thing leads to the next," says Caudill. She says the hard research is 'satisfying and makes her proud of her history. She traveled to James- town on her vacation last year to witness some of the places her fam- ily had been. There, standing on the banks of the Potomac River, she closed her eyes and envisioned the settlers stepping from their ship to the land. "It's almost like they want you to find them," says Caudill of her an- cestors. Crump says the library's depart- ment is just a place to begin. "We don't have a genealogist that does this for us now." But patrons finding their own information have graciously copied their notes to be added to the li- brary's existing resources. "If you get into genealogy expect a lot of work and time," says Crump. "For some people it's a lifetime of work." A lot of people don't get into genealogy until they're older. Then they regret their late start. That re- gret is called "genealogist's lament." Genealogist lament is saying, 'Oh I wish I had begun this earlier' or regretting not paying attention when grandpa was telling you all those old stories of his grandfathers life. Genealogy extends farther than history. While history collects dates and facts, genealogy uncovers soft- er details that flesh out the skeleton that history pieces together. Denton encourages people to ex, tend their search beyond the obvi- ous dry facts of a person or family's existence in history. Finding out their likes and dis- The third program will fund New Parent Packs that will be given to new parents as they leave the hospi- tal with their newborn. These packs will include a video on quality child care, as well as updated lists of all licensed child care centers and certi- fied.laome centers in Bath County, The last program funded will be a Multicultural, Family Diversity, and Physica!ly Challenged Resource Center that will be housed in the Bath County Memorial Library and will be available to all childcare pro- viders to check out and use with their children that they are caring for. This resource center will include books, videos, books-on-tape and manipu - lative toys and puzzlbs. Meeting Montgomery Post 22 of the Amer- ican Legion and the Ladies Auxil- Iary will meet Thursday, February 28. Pot-luck dinner, 5:30 p.m., at the Post Home on Winchester Road, Mount Sterling. All veterans, and their spouses, from Bath, Clark, Menifee, Mont- gomery, Nicholas and Powell coun- ties are invited to attend. Webelos #222 --Webelos Pack #222 toured the News- Outlook last Thursday to help them earn a newspaper badge. The scouts got to see how advertisements and pictures were made using computers and how the basic lay-out of a newspaper is done. Members of the troop are pictured, left to right: Kevin Lowe, Morgan Sorrell, Charley Guess, Jr., and pack leader, Charley Guess. (News- Outlook photo, Tonja May) School finances, personnel, supintendent under discussion [ --from front page I Bath County Education Association, spoke first to make known her dis- proval of the newly-approved staff- ing policy. The board told her the Central Office came up with the formula and that a big reason why the staffing formula was put into place, was be- cause of the potential 2.7 percent mandatory raise the school systems might be forced to fund without state aid. State Rep. Belcher and Sen. Palm- er addressed the issue. Belcher said she doesn't think the 2.7 percent mandate will go through. "I don't anticipate we'll pass an unfunded mandate," said Palmer. There was then confusion on why the staffing formula was put into place. Otis said he thought the rea- son the staffing formula was passed was because the schools were over- staffed. "We weren't looking at dollars (in cutting staff)," said Administrative Assistant Tereasa Caudill. "I think the communication is lack- ing," Nancy Hutchinson. She also mentioned that staff was "afraid" to come to the meeting and speak out. A parent spoke to ask-the board how they could allow an outside force (the state) fo tell them how many teachers the school system needed. His question was met with rousing applause. Assistant Principal at BCHS Greg Ramey said, "I understand that there will be a five and a half position cut at the high school. I heard we're the worst school system in the state. How will cutting staff benefit our school?" "We must balance our schools out," said Watson "We have to look at everybody." 1 : Remember i : : Letters ;o the r, are always welcome, II I hey must K s!gn wi  dresS and phone number: |1 It =i nHn ili:nln ...... .... i:: ..... ii: : ill :n ::::n : .......... =j Some teachers and staff spoke next, asking about pink slips and other staffing policy issues. Another issue mentioned by audi- ence members was Greg Ramey as a candidate for principal at BCHS. Barbara Damron, of BCHS, asked why the board refuses to consider his resume. It was mentioned by a parent that because Ramey has been in Bath County School Sytem for five years, that he could do the job better than an outside candidate. It was after that remark, that an angrv audience member made the remark, "cause lord knows we don't want another outsider in here!" While these issues were still hot, Crouch was given time to state her case. She began by saying, "I want to apologize to people for making a bad decision," (concerning her vote to hire Cheek). She brought up three items about Cheek using school money to buy the staff Halloween candy, using a school vehicle to pick up flowers in Jenkins, and paying for hotel rooms for three staff members attending a convention. She also had an invitation to Cheek's wife January retirement par- ty. Sandy alleged that the Cajun- themed party caused concern and that school time was used to pass out invitations. Laura Cheek asked permission from the board to speak and said that she was soley responsible for the invitations, doing them on her time, her computer and planning the party herself. "I am responsible for the bro- chure," she said. "What we do on our time is our the board pays her days of service, board mandate how lives. She also told the death threat her and said a local told them to turn when they reported Many more munity stood to and state their Crouch asked for nation. Watson ur attend meetin not only when pen. '3 was saddened everyone was one here," she said. she became and urged parents informed when they' Cheek sat quietly meeting, speaking ly spoken to. to read was Kelly joins C Central Bank. dent, Tom Prathel as Cc ing Officer. Mr. Corman jol bringing 1 i ence which includes er Service Re Operations, Security Kelly will be res mercial lending man graduated from High School and Kentucky with in Economics. He from ing and received his diploma from The tute of Banking. An act nity, Kelly Georgetown, Scott ber of Commerce ber. He is also the Scott Kiwanis. He and his live in Georgetown. Central Bank, subsidiary of Inc. which o service banking ATMs, that menl Fayette, Jessamine counties. Central assets are lion. Please clear, sharp to be publi: the New: News-Outlook 00abscription [$16501. 50 In Bath County Kentucky 00O01)LAND , 19 Water Street Owingsville (606) 674-2211 Nh01e Fryers, Ib ................... 69 Cut-Up Fryers, Ib ................. 79 Wampler 4 Ib. Bag Frozen Boneless Chicken Breast.S7.99 Wampler Fresh Turkey Breast, Ib ................. 99 Ballard's lib, Sausage ........ 99 10 lb. Bag Russet Potatoes Sale Dates: Feb. 26 - Mar. 4, 2002 NEW Store Hours: Mon.- Fri. 7 a.m.- 8 Sat. 8 a.m.- 8 p.m.; Sun. 9 a.m.- 7 p,m. Bank Roll starts M=rch 1st Dr=wing - March 9th $500.00 PRICE BREAKER SPECIALS Foodland Milk, gal., with 2 filled cards .................... $1.09 Juicy Juice, 46 oz., with 1 filled card ..i .................. $1.50 . Express Sliced Peaches, with 1 filled card .............. 79 .5 lb. Bag Domino Sugar, with 1 filled card ........... $1.79 . 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