"
Newspaper Archive of
Bath County News - Outlook
Owingsville, Kentucky
Lyft
June 27, 2013     Bath County News - Outlook
PAGE 7     (7 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 7     (7 of 16 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 27, 2013
 

Newspaper Archive of Bath County News - Outlook produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




News Outlook Your Hometown Newspaper June 27, 2013 - 7 tt Kentucky's seasonally adjusted preliminary unem- ployment rate rose to 8.1 percent in May from 7.9 per- cent in April 2013, according to the Office of Employment and Training (OET), an agency of the Kentucky Edu- cation and Workforce Devel- opment Cabinet. The preliminary May 2013 jobless rate was .2 percent- age points below the 8.3 per- cent rate recorded for the state in May 2012. The U.S. seasonally adjust- ed jobless rate increased to 7.6 percent in May 2013 from 7.5 percent in April 2013, ac- cording to the U.S. Depart- ment of Labor. Labor force statistics, in- cluding the unemployment rate, are based on estimates from the Current Population Survey of households. It is designed to measure trends rather than to count the ac- tual number of people work- ing. It includes jobs in agri- culture and those classified as self-employed. In May 2013, Kentucky's civilian labor force was 2,096,812, an increase of 3,810 individuals compared to the previous month. Em- ployment dropped by 416, while the number of unem- ployed people rose by 4,226. "The Kentucky labor mar- ket has softened, but hasn't lost momentum," said econo- mist Manoj Shanker of the OET. "Unfortunately, not all of the new entrants into the labor force were able to find jobs in May, caus'mg the unemployment rate to rise slightly." In a separate federal sur- vey of business establish- ments that excludes jobs in agriculture and people who are self-employed, Ken- tucky's seasonally adjusted nonfarm employment rose by 3,800 jobs to 1,838,900 in May 2013 from the previous month. On an over-the-year basis, the state's non.farm employment has added 14,800 jobs. "Kentucky is adding jobs but the pace has slowed. The primary reason is. at b piJi'trdhV i";" fallen as Europe and Asia struggle with their own economies," Shanker said. Nonfarm data is provided by the Bureau of Labor Sta- tistics' Current Employment Statistics program. Accord- ing to this survey, five of Kentucky's 11 major non- farm North American In- dustry Classification System (NAICS) job sectors regis- tered gains in employment, while four declined and two remained unchanged. Kentucky's trade, trans- portation and utilities sector jumped by 3,700 jobs in May 2013. This is the largest sec- tor in Kentucky with 377,500 positions, and accounts for about 20 percent of nonfarm employment. Since May 2012, jobs in this sector have increased by 7,100. "More than half of the jobs added in this sector were in retail trade. Consumers in Kentucky are confident about their job prospects and it translates into an increase in retail trade employment," said Shanker. The state's professional and business services sec- tor expanded by 3,500 jobs in May 2013. This category includes establishments en- gaged in services that sup- port the day-to-day activities of other organizations, in- eluding temporary employ- ment services. Since last May, jobs in the sector have increased by 5,100. The financial activities sector gained 600 jobs in May 2013. Compared to May a year ago, businesses in- volved ifi finance, insurance, real estate and property leas- ing have increased by 2,000 jobs. The information sector added 300 jobs in May 2013. This segment has declined by 1,200 positions since May 2012. The industries in this sector include traditional publishing as well as soft- ware publishing; motion pic- tures and broadcasting; and telecommunications. The government sector, which includes public educa- tion, public administration agencies and state-owned hospitals, increased by 100 jobs in May 2013. The sector had 200 fewer jobs compared to May 2012. The number of jobs in the other services sector, which includes repairs and main- tenance, personal care ser- vices, and religious organiza- tions, remained unchanged from April 2013 to May 2013. Compared to a year ago, there has been a loss of 2,800 jobs. Employment in the mining and logging sector was flat from April 2013 to May 2013. The number of jobs in this sector has declined by 2,700 or nearly 13 percent since last May. Kentucky's leisure and hospitality sector lost 500 jobs in May 2013. Since May 2012, the sector has jumped An ordinance amending the Menifee County budget for fiscal year 2013, to include unanticipated receipts and to increase expenditures for the General, Road. LGEA and Animal Shelter Funds which totals $24,383.83 was adopted by the Menifee County Fiscal Court on June 11, 2013. A copy of the adopted ordinance with full text is available for public inspection at the office if the county judge/exec during normal business hours. Published in the Bath County News Outlook on 06.2Z 13 I An ordinance amending the Menifee County budget for fiscal year 2013, to include unanticipated receipts and to increase expenditures for the General, Road, Jail and Park Funds which totals $173,277.38 was adopted by the Menffee County Fiscal Court on June 11, 2013. A copy of the adopted ordinance with full text is available for public inspection at the office iftbe county )~dge/exec during normal business hours. .1 Published in the Bath ~mnty News Outlook on 06.2Z 13 An ordinance amending the Menifee County budget for fiscal year 2013, to include unanticipated receipts and to increase expenditures for the General and LGEA Funds which totals $12,526.09 was adopted by the Menifee County Fiscal Court on June 24, 2013. A copy of the adopted Ordinance with full text is available for public inspection at the office of the c0unty judge/exec during normal business hours. Published in the Bath Count~ News Outlook on 06.2Z13 i Do you stay overly tired? Evaluation may be essential to your health and vitality. DR.COMBS & ASSOCIATES , ) CARDIOVASCULAR & SLEEf CONSUISITING SERVICES 24 Clinic Drl've Paris, Kv4036 l Office: 859.987.0302 www.drcombsandassociates.com &gahisticated Medical Care in a hometown setting. -~oJfice based testing Bath County News-Outlook (USPS 045260) is published every Thursday by M.C. Investments d/b/a/Bath County News-Outlook, 81-A Water St., Owingsville, KY 40360 Periodicals Postage Rates are paid at OwingsviUe, KY 40360 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Bath County News,Outlook, PO Box 577, Owingsville, KY 40360 Members of the Kentucky Press Association The International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors loll SUBSCI~VTION RATES: ~KN fir year im Bath Ceuty, Yd~.~-'hewhere iD Ktmtnelq/nd $3S.OO mt of state. Subemr/ipiem iadad utlet tax where applleable. All sal~acrilpiom payable ia advam~ ] by 3,500 positions. This sec- tor includes arts, entertain- ment, recreation, accommo- dation and food services. The educational and health services sector dropped by 900 positions in May 2013. The sector has posted an increase of 1,000 jobs since May 2012. The state's manufactur- ing sector fell by 1,300 po- sitions in May 2013. Since May 2012, employment in manufacturing has shot up by 6,000 jobs. ~l'he current drop in manufacturing is in the area of nondurable goods, which includes food processing as well as plastics and petro- leum products. The more dominant durable goods subsector has expanded con- siderably in response to do- mestic demand for Kentucky made automobiles and ma- chinery," said Shanker. The construction sector decreased by 1,700 positions in May 2013 from a month ago. Since May 2012, em- ployment in construction has dropped by 3,000 jobs. "Construction employ- ment in Kentucky has de- dined for seven of the last 12 months. Even historically low interest rates haven't been able to spur construc- tion jobs in Kentucky," said Shanker. Civilian labor force sta- tistics include nonmilitary workers and unemployed Kentuckians who are ac- tively seeking work. They do not include unemployed Kentuckians who have not looked for employment with- in the past four weeks. Kentucky's statewide un- employment rate and em- ployment levels are season- ally adjusted. Employment statistics undergo sharp fluctuations due to seasonal events, such as weather changes, harvests, holidays and school openings and closings. Seasonal adjust- ments eliminate these influ- ences and make it easier to observe statistical trends. However, because of the small sample size, county unemployment rates are not seasonally adjusted. An ordinance amending the Menifee County budget for fiscal year 2013, to include unanticipated receipts and to increase expenditures for the Senior Citizen Fund which totals $500,000 was adopted by the Menifee County Fiscal Court on June 11, 2013. A copy of the adopted ordinance with full text is available for pubhc inspection at the office if the county judge/exec during normal business hours. r Published in the Bath County ?.ews Outlook on 06.2Z13 m Submitted by the Bath Court ty Historical Society April 30, 1865 - The surren der of Confederate troops fight hag in Kentucky occurred h Bath County. Capt. Edward Ow hags "Ned" Guerrant, of Sharps burg, was among them. In hL, diary, he wrote: "And on the morrow, th~ last day of April, 1865, amid th~ tears of nature and of men, th~ saddest funeral procession tha ever trod the soil of Kentucky marched into NIL Sterling t( bury hopes that had been cher ished for years, and baptized ii the best of blood of the braves hearts that ever beat for free dom... They ~ad fought the goo( fight, and kept the faith, an( though the crown of victory di( not encircle their brow, the tri umph of the deathless principh they defended so heroically will ultimately crown them con querors - with an imperishabh fame." Source: ed. Swent0r, M. "Bluegrass Confederate: Th~ Headquarters Diary of Edward. O. Guerrant." Child Find for Children with Disabilities in Need of Special Education or 504 Services lune 2013 Child Find The Bath County School District keeps educational records in a secure location in each school and Board office. The Bath County School District obtains written consent from a parent or digible student (age 18 or who is attending a post- secondary institution), before disdosing personally identifiable information to an entity or individual not authorized to receive it under FERPA. For students who have been determined eligible for Special Education, educational records will be destroyed at the request of the parents when they are no longer needed to provide educational programs or services. The Bath County School District may destroy the educational records of a child without parent request three years after they are no longer needed to provide educational programs or services. Parents are advised that data contained in the records may later be needed for Social Security benefits or other purposes. The Bath County School District may retain, for an indefinite period of time, a record of the student's name, address, telephone number, grades, attendance records classes attended, grade levgl completed, and year completed. Children eligible for Special Education include those children with disabilities who have autism, deaf-blindness, developmental delay, emotional-behavior disability, hearing impairment, mental disability, multiple disabilities, orthopedic impairment, other health impairment, specific learnin~l disabilit~ speech or language impairmenl~, tranmatic baai~ in~i:y, or ,visual impairment and who because of such an l~alpatrment need Specxal E~ucalaon services. Children digible for 504 services include those children in a pubhc elementary and secondary education program who have a current physical or mental impairment that currently substantially limits some ma)or life activity which causes the student's ability to access the school environment or school activities to be substantially limited. Children eligible for the State-Funded Preschool program include three- and four-year-old children identified with disabilities and four-year-old children who are at-risk, as defined by federal poverty levels up to 150%. Preschool children digible for spe- cial education must have an Individual Education Plan (IEP) instead of a 504 plan to receive State-Funded Preschool program services. The Bath County School District has an ongoing "Child Find~ system, which is designed to locate, identify and evaluate any child residing in a home, facility, or residence within its geographical boundaries, age three ( 3 ) to twenty-one (21 ) years, who may have a disability and be in need of Special Education or 504 services. ~fis indudes children who are not in school; those who are in public, private, or home school; those who are highly mobile such as children who are migrant or homeless; and those who are advancing from grade to grade, who may need but are not receiving Special Education or 504 services. The district's "Child Find" system includes children with disabilities attending private or home schools within the school district boundaries who may need special education services. The Bath County School District will make sure any child enrolled in its district who qualifies for Special Education or 504 services, regardless of bow severe the disability, is provided appropriate Special Education or 504 services at no cost to the parents of the cb_ild. Parents, relatives, public and private agency employees, and concerned citizens are urged to help the Bath County School District find any child who may have a disability and need Special Education or 504 services. The District needs to know the name and age, or date of birth of the child; the name, address, and phone number(s) of the parents or guardian; the possible disability; and other information to determine if Special Education or 504 services are needed. Letters and phone calls are some of the ways the Bath County School District collects the information needed. The informa- tion the school District collects will be used to contact the parents of the child and find out ff the child needs to be evaluated or referred for Special Education or 504 services. If you know of a child who lives within the boundaries of the Bath County School District, who may have a disability, and may need but is not receiving Special Education or 504 services, please call 606-674-6314 or send the information to: Director of Special Education Section 504 Coordinator Bath County Schools 405 West Main Street Owingsville, Kentucky 40360 Ph. 606-674-6314 If you know of a child who attends a private or home school within the boundaries of the Bath County School District, who may have a disability, and may need but is not receiving Special Education services, please call 606-674-6314 or send the information to: Director of Special Education 405 West Main Street Owingsville, Kentucky 40360 Ph. 606-674-6314 "Child Find" activities will continue throughout the school year. As part of these efforts the Bath County School District will use screening information, student records, and basic assessment information it collects on all children in the District to hdp locate those children who have a disability and need Special Education or 504 services. Any information the District collects through "Child Find" is maintained confidentially. Written Policies and Procedures have been developed which describe the District's requirements regarding the confidentiality of personally identifiable information and "Child Find~ activities. There are copies in the Principal's office of each school, and in the Board of Education office. Copies of these Policies and Procedures may be obtained by contacting: Superintendent 405 West Main Street Owingsville, Kentucky 4036 Ph. 606-674-6314 The District office is open Monday through Friday, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30p.m. The Bath County School District provides a public notice in the native language or other mode of communication of the vari- ous populations in the geographical boundaries of the District to the extent feasible. If you know of someone who may need this notice translated to another language, given orall)~ or delivered in some other manner or mode of communication, please contact the Superintendent, the Director of Special Education or the Section 504 Coordinator at the address or phone number listed above for the Bath County Schools. WE ENCOURAGE LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Bath County News-Outlook welcomes letters to the editor. Letters must be signed and include a daytime phone number for confirmation. Unconfirmed letters and unsigned letters will not be published Phone numbers are not published We reserve the right to deny publication of letters and to edit letters for content. The deadline for letters to the editor is 5 p.m. Friday. Send letters to: Editor, Bath County News-Outlook P.O. Box 577 Owingsville, KY 40360 Letters may also be e-mailed to: melissa@kynewsgroup.com However, if e-mail is used, the sender should cal1606-674-9994 to confirm that the letter was received HOW TO REACH US Mailing address: P.O. Box 577, Owingsville, KY 40360 Phone: 606-674-9994 Fax: 606-674-9994 Email for news and advertising: melissa@kynewsgroup.com Published in the Bath County News Outlook on 06.27.13 DEADLINES: Editorial copy deadline is 5 p.m. Friday. Advertising copy wit[ proof deadline 5 p.m. Friday, advertising copy without proof, 10 a.m. Friday Classified advertising deadline 10 a.m. Tuesday. .-. PHOTOS/ELECTRONIC ADVERTISING: Color, black and white and digits photos are all accepted. Digital photos should be submitted in the jpg format anc can be emalled. Old photos will be accepted at any time. Please do not submi~ newspaper clippings or photocopies. Photos may be picked up after they art published in the newspaper. Electronic Advertising must be submitted in pdl format and can be emailed to the above address. LEGAL ADVERTISING: Font-Arial, Size-7/8. Deadline 5 p.m. Friday. All submitted copy must be signed and include a daytime pkone number Bath County News-Outlook rescues the right to reject any submission to this newspaper. While it i~ the policy of this paper to print as much local material as possible, it is necessmy to retain this right. W~ reserve the right to edit any submitted editorial material. The publication reserves the fight to use the wore Advertising at any time management feels it is appropriate. Advertisers assume respoasibility for advertising content aad shall hold without claim Bath Coant) News-Outlook for advertising published. The publisher is not liable for verbal or telephone materials take~ with the intent of publishing. Any legal fees, collection costs or related charges will be the responsibility o] the advertiser. I ~ t