"
Newspaper Archive of
Bath County News - Outlook
Owingsville, Kentucky
Lyft
December 11, 2003     Bath County News - Outlook
PAGE 1     (1 of 18 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 1     (1 of 18 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 11, 2003
 

Newspaper Archive of Bath County News - Outlook produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




The Bath Countyf.% / aim 134 8-8-@0 **HIXED A 4@@ Iw8 rI,id. 55P 478 C 65 BOX 2@1 "'H@65 AP AR 72852-9501 This award-winning newspaper is invited into homes in Bath, Rowan, Montgomery, Menifee, Nicholas, and Fleming Counties 20 Your Hometown Newspaper mber 11, 2003 (045260) P.O, Box 577, Fiscal Court to update system Haskins County Fiscal Court night to discuss, many items, the recre- tourims tax, and the of updating its aging 9- through some federal that has recently become Moore, chairman of the Recreation and Commission, was in to discuss the city's hotel tax. that a 1-percent tax and a 3-percent be implemented county- of just inside the limits. The rev- would then the maintenance and of county parks. proposed restaurant tax is than those already in in Morehead and Mt. Moore said, Walter Shrout his support for the pro- it would be a good Shrout said. "The city is an effort to create some they want to include later commented, "This to be for the whole com- Santa comes m town... r  .. for the annual Owingsville/Bath County Chamber of Commerce Christmas Parade Saturday, Santa did come to town for an early appearance, and rather than in his sleigh, he came aboard Charles Orme's big buckboard, wagon-style. The large modernized wagon was pulled by Orme's renown Belgium horses. Santa's appearance was pleas- ing to the many young- sters-who bundled up to see'him up close. The parade featured many entries, all which con- tributed to getting people in the spirit of the holi- days. --News'Outlooik photos, Ken Metz Along with Santa were at least two of his helpers In Saturday's parade. Here Paula Wyatt end Kenny aka "The Big- Eared EIP Risen, rode in the back of a red truck, greeting all who braved the cold to welcome the Christmas season. of will Bath be using County. these Bath County Grand Jury returns action was taken on the : the evening. The rec- will be considered for further dis- during the next fiscal next item for discussion the county's 911 System. The current between 10 and 15 and needs replacing. Shrout informed the Bath County has the to obtain federal towards the purchase of computers and other provided by the gov- would equal approxi- $180,000, however, the would have to obtain the remaining cost of a estimated that the would need to come up 000 for the project, Bath seeking loans funds, Shrout said. a one time deal," Shrout 'to funding, "If you take advantage of it, oyou Shrout made a motion to the proposal for obtain- new 911 system. The was seconded by E.H. and carried without Turn to BATH FISCAL, Page 18 7 felony indictments November 20 The Bath County Grand Jury met November 20 and returned seven felony indictments, remanded one case to district court, and dismissed three cases. The election report was also reviewed as the grand jury'had questions about some missing sig- natures and requested the county clerk contact his election officers to get the missing signatures and report again. In the case of the Commonwealth of Kentucky ver- sus Cathy H. Ferguson, the grand jury charges that on or about March 19 in Bath County, the defendant committed the offense of theft by unlawful taking when she knowingly and unlawfully took or exercised control over cer- tain movable property, having a value in excess of $300, belonging to another with the intent to deprive him thereof, to wit: she cashed a payroll check in the amount of $8,448.33 from Rogers Foam afther she had reponvA that she never received the check. In the case of the Commonwealth of Kentucky ver- sus Larry McCarty, the grand jury charges that on or about July 3, 2003 in Bath County, the defen- dant committed the offense of first-degree bail jumping when he, having been released from cus- tody by court order on the condi- tion to appear at a specified time and place in connection with a felony charge and intentionally failed to appear for a court appear- ance in Bath Circuit Court on Indictment No. 02-CR-00038. In the case of the Commonwealth of Kentucky ver- sus Larry McCarty, the grand jury charges that on or about July 3, 2003 in Bath County, the defen- dant committed the offense of first-degree bail jumping when he, having been released from cus- tody by court order on the condi- tion to appear at a specified time and place in connection with a felony charge and intentionally failed to appear for a court appear- ance in Bath Circuit Court on Indictment No. 02-CR-00037. In the case of the Commonwealth of Kentucky ver- sus Carla PoweU Richmond, the grand jury charges that on or about July 18, 2003 in Bath Count-y, the defendant committed the following: Count One: com- mitted the offense of operating a motor vehicle under the influence when she was found to be driving a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. This being the defendant's fourth such offense within (5) years; Count "Ibvo: committed the offense of fleeing/evading police, first- dege, when she disobeyed a direction to stop her motor vehicle ,after receiving visual and audible signals from Trooper Michelle Lunsford, Officer Wee Everman, and Officer Rick Highley, and Richmond was operating her motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol or any other substance; Count Three: committed the offense of operating a motor vehi- cle while licen revoked or sus- pended for driving under the influ- ence when she was found to be driving a motor vehicle while her license was revoked as a result of her conviction for a violation of KRS 189A.010. This being the defendant's first such offense. In the case of the Commonwealth of Kentucky ver- sus Kalvin Hunter, the grand jury charges that on or about a period of time from January 1, 2000 to November 20, 2003 in Bath County, the defendant committed the offense of flagrant non-sup- port when he knowingly and unlawfully failed to provide child support for a minor child for which he was under a court order to do so. Said arrearages now total the sum of $7,064.65. In the case of the Commonwealth of Kentucky ver- sus Brady Joel Thompson, the grand jury charged that on or --Turn to BATH COUNTY, Page 18 / clerk Donna Vanlandingham and Principal Sharon Smithstand with OES stu- (left to right) Cable Wri Braden Barr Christina Crouch, Amyllia Preston, Hope. and Homes on Tour on Sunday's Owingsville/Bath Co. Woman's Club Open 2-5 p.m. with tea to be hosted at Virginia Lollis home. The home of Bob and Vanessa Carpenter The home of Bob and Vanessa Carpenter is located at 5 Bath Avenue in Owingsville. It is a one and one-half story Cape Cod style house, built by Aitkin Dame, in 1938-1939. They pur- chased it in October from Darnell. It is very unusual to be the only second owner on a home that is over 60 years-old, but that Is what makes this house so charming. The second floor includes two bedrooms and a bathroom. The first floor has a liv- ing room, dining room, a third bedroom, that has been convert- ed into an office, an eat-in kitchen, and a sunroom on the rear of the home. The basement includes family room, worshop, and laundry room, The little things and small details are what makes the home unique, from the dated bathroom fixtures, to the skeleton key locks, to the custom-ordered pink range that matches the pink cabinets, this house has a definite style of its own. Though the Carpenters have lived In the home for only a a few months, the warm reception that they have received from their neighbors, has already made It feel like home. The home of Roger and Glenda Wills Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Roger retired early from Westinghouse where he spent 25 years as an environmental attorney, and Glenda was a stay-at-home room, floral shop owner, volunteer, hockey morn, etc. The couple has one son, Andy, who is a pilot for USAir/Piedmont, and lives in North Carolina. Their home, built by Jerry Adkins and crew in 1999-2000, is based on a Southern Living house plan "Low Country Cottage" that evolved into more of a farmhouse design. The house fulfills Glenda's life-long desire to have a.'yellow house" and Roger's desire to have enough room to "get away from Glenda." They have the beginnings of a Black Angus herd and are truly enjoying the adventures of country life, If you are wondering why "Bath County?" Roger is a cousin of John K. Wills, retired county ag agent. The home of Virginia LoIlls The home of Virginia Loltis at 51 East Main Street in Owingsvtlle, was built in 1930 by Tom Shrout. In following years, it was the home of Miss Ollie Bailey, Mrs. Nathan Friedman, and David and Peggy Clark. In 1992, it became the home of Virginia and Molllle LoSs. The house is fumished with antiques collect- ed by Mrs. Lollls and her familiy over the past 50 years. Many of the antiques are from local estates. Presents from home I I I I II 0ES students remembering servicemen at Christmas; send Spencer Wells gifts to share with his comrades ...... diers face the continuous threat of By Kirby Haskins violence in order to secure free- News.Outlook staff writer This holiday season, millions of us will spend the next few weeks going through the yearly routines of what constitutes the average American Christmas. Decorating the tree, attending church services, mall shopping, visits from family and friends, and an old-fashioned Christmas din- ner, are some things many of us can look forward to. Yet, there are others who wish to take part in the many festivities of the holiday season, but cannot. Half a world away, nearly 130,000 American troops will spend this Christmas in the sands of the Iraqi desert. Instead of celebrating the holi- days with loved ones, U.S. sol- dom and guarantee the prosperity of liberty throughout the world. For them, there are no Christmas trees. There is no anticipation of a Christmas morning present. And spending the holidays with family members, means a short phone call home at best. Yet, each day they carry on. And each night news coverage pro- vides us with a small glimpse of the daily woes they encounter in Iraq. We take for granted the price American troops pay for our free- dom. This Christmas season, Owingsville Elementary School students have worked hard to bring smiles to the faces of our troops overseas. Students have sent care packages, complete with letters, Christmas cards, envelopes, stationary, shampoo, toothpaste, and many other simple items, the average American takes for granted. OES receptionist Donna Vanlandinghana first suggested the school do something for the troops to remind them they are not forgotten during the holidays. "Everyone thought it would be a g idea and the children were very receptive," she ys. "We had an overwhelming response." There was an overwhelming reSlXmse indeed. Students in each grade answered the call and soon letters, cards, and various dona- tions, came piling in. Fourth-grader Christina Crouch was eager to show her thanks to the troops. "When I heard about it, I .d --Turn to OES STUDENTS, Page 18